Dec 312013
 

tux-tmIt took me quite a lot and quite long time of experimenting before finding the proper way to do this, especially considering that Mavericks is a bit different from the previous felines… and that I was using Debian Squeeze…

I’ve finally been able to achieve it (and testing with file restore also), hence I’ve decided to document here my configuration hoping it will be of some benefit for others.

To be clear: this is a document to build a backup system “à la Time Machine” for your Mac based on Mavericks OS X 10.9.1 using a file share on Debian Linux and AFP protocol.

First of, some statements about false/deviating info I’ve found on other sites:

  • You cannot use AFP with Mavericks, since it defaults to SMB2 ==> not true. I have a working configuration using AFP
  • You can use whatever Debian/Ubuntu version, at worst you just tune your config ==> not true. At least not for me. It all started working when I moved from the previous Squeeze Debian (6.0) to the latest greatest Wheezy (7.0)
  • It’s hard to configure the stuff, requires programming/scripting. Not true. Sure, you need to modify some configuration files on your Linux box… but if you are not able to vi some files, maybe you should think to have another operating system.

As said, please ensure your Debian Linux is at version 7.0 (Wheezy). If not, you should really consider to upgrade. It’s free, well documented, easy and it will save you tons of days and headaches trying to make bits behave 🙂

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Nov 012013
 

Despite what it might seems at a first look, this is NOT a complicated thing.

The advantages are enormous… especially if you own a developer account: it would allows you to test the evolution of this awesome OS blended with great benefits of virtualization such as snapshotting.

Whatever is the reason why you wanna install Mavericks on your ESXi box, you’ll find here detailed instructions which have been tested and found working by me 😉

First of all, you need an important piece of software… and no, this software is not illegal, nor it could ruin your precious ESXi 5.1 installation. I’m talking about the mighty Unlocker for VMware by Donk, available from InsanelyMac (free registration).

This is a bunch of bytes which will enable your ESXi to boot a valid Mavericks image.

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Oct 292013
 

This post is a corollary to the previous one on building iOS client based IPSec VPN with the Stonesoft NGFW.

Testing the same configuration with OS X native VPN client, which you can configure in System Preferences – Network, I’ve found that things have changed a little bit in Mountain Lion (and Mavericks). Due to the Gatekeeper enhanced protection, you need to enter your Keychain on the Mac to modify some privileges.

Click on System and identify the certificate you are using to authenticate your machine.

Once found, you just need to expand it to show the private key portion as shown below (yeah, screenshot is in Italian but I think you get the point):

PrivateKey

 

Then you “open” the access to the component to every application as shown below (again, screenshot in Italian):

OpenAccess

Once you do this and confirm, the VPN will restart to work as previously (for example, in Snow Leopard).

Enjoy,

RoarinPenguin

Jan 262012
 

As usual, not that immediate to find a proper answer on the ‘Net, hence I’m providing one here.

While in Snow Leopard was quite easy to see your ext2/ext3 formatted disks via MacFuse and ext2-fuse, in Lion you need to install another fuse fork and select a special option. That new fork is OSXFUSE, which latest release at the time of this post if from December 2011.

The most common symptom indicating you need this is to try mounting an ext2/3 formatted drive and see the following error:

fuse-ext2 /dev/disk3s1 /Volumes/Movies
dyld: Library not loaded: /usr/local/lib/libfuse.2.dylib
 Referenced from: /usr/local/bin/fuse-ext2
 Reason: image not found

During the installation of OSXFUSE, you need to enable MacFuse Compatibility Layer by flagging the appropriate checkbox as shown below:

click to zoom

Once you’re done with this, replug your ext2/3 formatted drive and it’ll automagically mount it in Finder, giving your deserved magnificent user experience of a Mac user 😉