Nov 012013
 

Despite what it might seems at a first look, this is NOT a complicated thing.

The advantages are enormous… especially if you own a developer account: it would allows you to test the evolution of this awesome OS blended with great benefits of virtualization such as snapshotting.

Whatever is the reason why you wanna install Mavericks on your ESXi box, you’ll find here detailed instructions which have been tested and found working by me 😉

First of all, you need an important piece of software… and no, this software is not illegal, nor it could ruin your precious ESXi 5.1 installation. I’m talking about the mighty Unlocker for VMware by Donk, available from InsanelyMac (free registration).

This is a bunch of bytes which will enable your ESXi to boot a valid Mavericks image.

Continue reading »

Feb 232012
 

Because all of my Mac systems were upgraded at home were upgraded from Snow Leopard to Mac OS X Lion, I did not noticed that Apple left out of Lion (when freshly installed like on my Mac Mini Server) iDVD and iWeb.

For iWeb not a very big deal since I can user the awesome Wiki3 bundled with the server, but iDVD was  something I used from time to time to create slideshows and movies to be played in standard DVD players (yes, Apple, there are still some around 😉 ).

With much surprise, I’ve discovered that iDVD can be “installed” on my Mini Server by proceeding as follows:

  • on your Mac where you still have an iDVD version, right click on the application and select “Compress iDVD”
  • on your Mac in folder /Library/Application Support/iDVD, compress the subfolder Themes using same technique
  • copy the two compressed files on your new Lion and unzip them by double clicking on the compressed files.
  • copy the iDVD package (the one with the blue icon resembling a DVD) in your Applications folder
  • create a folder named iDVD in /Library/Application Support/
  • copy the Themes directory in /Library/Application Support/iDVD folder
  • launch iDVD and enjoy
Apr 222008
 

Running vmware-config-tools.pl script on a guest CentOS 5.1 virtual machine in a VMWare Server 1.0.5 environment will not find the proper kernel modules, so it will prompt you to compile the modules.

To do this you need a compiling environment (namely gcc) and the C kernel headers installed.

If your machine is connected to the Internet, this is easily solved by invoking the following commands:

<prompt># yum install gcc (about 8+ Mb)

<prompt> yum install kernel-devel (about 4.7 Mb)